The latest news on the API economy

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API Spotlight: Planets Nu, Advice Slip, and Postmaster APIs

Of the many APIs we published this week, thirteen were highlighted on the blog by our team of writers. In this post, we’ll shine a spotlight on those thirteen, which included the eBay API. After the creation of their developer platform in 2000, eBay has released 19 individual APIs that are split to cater to sellers or buyers. To learn more about the eBay API visit the In-Depth eBay API blog post as well as the eBay site.

What Kinds of APIs Do Developers Most Love?

Having a directory with over 5,000 APIs and 6,000 mashups gives us some insight into what developers are interested in building and what their go to tools are. Today we're taking a look at the most common categories of APIs as used in our mashup directory. It's no surprise to see mapping claim the top spot with more than double the number of APIs used compared to the second most popular category, social. Below is a list of the top 10 API categories along with the most popular APIs within each.

5,000 APIs: Facebook, Google and Twitter Are Changing the Web

Our API directory has hit another major milestone. We now list 5,000 APIs, just a short four months since passing 4,000. No longer is the web simply about links connecting one site to another. Instead, developers are using tools to connect data and functionality from one site to another site. It's an incredible transformation that has happened over a very short period of time. APIs are at the heart of Google's strategy and they led directly to the growth enjoyed by Twitter and Facebook.

Facebook Partners: At Least 15 Have APIs

When Facebook announced its timeline partners yesterday, there were many familiar names on the list. Some were especially familiar to us because, in addition to now adding their "actions" to Facebook, they also provide APIs to access data created by their users.

Early Winners and Losers of the Platform Wars

A long time ago in Internet years, in a galaxy not so far away, a handful of tech titans in Silicon Valley and Seattle began building business platforms and battling for supremacy. The mobile device and app revolution hadn't yet begun. Terms like "social networking" and "wisdom of crowds" were going “viral". Web services and APIs were still emerging. The Google IPO of late 2004 had effectively slammed shut the Web 1.0 dotbomb era, paving the way for the amazing evolution of Web 2.0 services in 2005 that hit the mainstream in 2006.