An Amazon and Microsoft Pact

John Musser
Jul. 25 2006, 09:21AM EDT

Phil Wainewright over at ZDNet dug a little deeper into some news from Amazon and their just-out-of-beta Simple Queue Service (SQS). What he found was that SQS will be directly supported by Windows Communication Foundation, the web services foundation for Windows Vista (and to be retrofitted to Windows XP).

As he points-out this is interesting news to developers, including those often out of the mashup loop: enterprise developers.

What this means is that a developer can write an application that runs on a Windows desktop or server and use Amazon SQS as the messaging infrastructure to exchange information with systems and applications located anywhere else in the Web.

Anyone wondering what the post-Java EE world might look like has their answer right here. Forget expensive middleware infrastructure. Just pay by the drink for your application-to-application messaging needs, however sporadic they may be. Amazon SQS charges $0.10 per 1000 messages and $0.20 per GB of data, with no minimum fee and no setup cost.

With "simple" but useful and reliable services like Simple Queue Service and the Simple Storage Service Amazon is building genuine foundational components for the internet operating system.

John Musser

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[...] This piece from the always-informative ProgrammableWeb.com is thought-provoking.  Everyone is watching Google and Yahoo, but maybe Amazon or eBay will wind up being the main provider of application development infrastructure for the web.  After all, General Motors is now one of the world&#8217;s biggest providers of financial services&#8230; [...]

[...] The crucial difference from the original vision is that the utility isn't delivering the final application, it merely offers slices of infrastructure that developers incorporate into their own applications. Some technology visionaries believe that's what makes it so significant. Here's what John Musser at programmableweb wrote in response to the release of Simple Queue Service (SQS) last month: &quot;With 'simple' but useful and reliable services like Simple Queue Service and the Simple Storage Service Amazon is building genuine foundational components for the internet operating system.&quot; [...]

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