1001 Mashups

John Musser
Sep. 21 2006, 12:59AM EDT

Today the number of mashups on ProgrammableWeb hit the 1,001 milestone. The overall distribution in terms of topic (tags) of course has maps with the lion's share at 46%, then next in line are photo (9%), search (9%), shopping (7%), sports (5%), travel (4%), messaging (4%) and news (4%). Here's today's summary pie chart:

Top Mashup Tags

Beyond the most common topics you can see the subject matter varies widely -- with lots of mashups categorized under tags like: dating, religion, animals, books, environment, and television. Keep in mind that this is a sample of the mashup universe, a space with tens or hundreds of thousands of mashups depending on what you choose to include. And feeding the growth of mashups is the growth of APIs, now with 275 listed here. Not surprisingly the latest is a map mashup, this time the Moviemappr. It's a mashup that combines filming location data -- what movies were filmed where -- with product data from the Amazon API. Good premise although the UI, as with many maps mashups, leaves a bit to be desired. Also today is the mashup If I Dig Straight Down that uses a pair of Google Maps to show where the opposite side of the earth is from a given point. Somewhat derivative of the more original earlier Dig to the Other Side.

John Musser

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[...] ProgrammableWeb now lists 1001 web service mashups. 46% involve mapping, mostly with Google Maps, which means that when Google goes into Chapter 11 and the sheriffs shut its servers down, almost 500 online applications will suddenly stop working.  OK, it&#8217;s unlikely to happen tomorrow, but as I told my software architecture class yesterday, a good architect takes possible failure modes into account when designing a system. If VA had tanked in 2001, and SourceForge had gone offline, it would have set open source back a year; what&#8217;s the likely economic impact of GMail disappearing? [...]