$25,000 E-signature Hackathon From DocuSign Coming in May

Adam DuVander
Apr. 21 2011, 07:56AM EDT

E-signature company DocuSign is celebrating its new San Francisco office with a Hackathon on May 14 and 15. The event will bring developers together to build atop its DocuSign Enterprise API. After 35 non-stop hours of heated competition, four winners will receive $25,000 (USD) cash prizes.

The DocuSign API provides interfaces that enable developers to create standalone applications or integrations allowing external applications to send documents for signature, generate custom forms to collect data, report on the status of transactions, and embed the DocuSign signing process directly into other applications, both cloud and software based.

DocuSign Chief Technology Officer Grant Peterson said he's looking forward to innovative applications due to the hackathon. "Developers can go way beyond just sending a document for a signature and enable applications to completely control the end-to-end document process," Peterson said.

DocuSign Hackathon prizes:

  • Most Innovative App - $10,000 USD Grand Prize
  • Best Consumer App - $5,000 USD Prize
  • Best Enterprise App sponsored by Box.net - $5,000 USD Prize
  • Best Mobile App - $5,000 USD Prize

In addition to using DocuSign (a ProgrammableWeb sponsor), developers can integrate with others APIs. In fact, the event is co-sponsored by some API companies, including the Twilio API and Box.net API. Other sponsors include HTC and Clearwire. ProgrammableWeb is a media sponsor.

The hackathon will lead up to the DocuSign Summit, with two days of workshops and sessions on May 16 and 17. The DocuSign Hackathon will run from 9 a.m. PDT on Saturday, May 14, until 8 p.m. PDT on Sunday, May 15, 2011 at DocuSign’s Bay Area offices at 111 Sutter Street, 10th Floor in downtown San Francisco. To be part of the hackathon, register at DocuSign.

Adam DuVander -- Adam heads developer relations at Orchestrate, a database-as-a-service company. He's spent many years analyzing APIs and developer tools. Previously he worked at SendGrid, edited ProgrammableWeb and wrote for Wired and Webmonkey. Adam is also the author of mapping API cookbook Map Scripting 101.

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