4 New APIs: a Job Search API, a Movies API, a Book Metadata API, and an API for Researchers

John Musser
Mar. 17 2010, 02:11PM EDT

As we noted the other day, we've seen an increase in the rate of new APIs added to our API directory. Some of the latest entries include a new job search API, an API for accessing book metadata in RDF, a movie clip API (our recent coverage), and an API for researchers in archaeology, museum collections, and other field sciences. More details on each of these below:

LinkUp Job Search EngineLinkUp Job Search Engine API: LinkUp is a job search engine that only lists jobs taken directly from over 20,000 company websites. Developers can use the API to develop their own custom job searching solutions. Access the data directly in both XML and JSON formats. Full documentation is not publicly available.

Movieclips.comMovieclips.com API: Movieclips.com is a site that has collected movie clips and made them completely searchable by actor, title, genre, occasion, action, mood, character, theme, setting, prop, and even dialogue. The Movieclips API allows approved partners to interact with the movieclips.com search engine, clips, and metadata. Some of the data returned include duration, movie title, dialogue and more. The API allows developers to integrate movie clips into their applications. Full documentation is not publicly available. Developers may submit a proposal which is reviewed and granted.

O'Reilly Product Metadata InterfaceO'Reilly Product Metadata Interface API: This experimental O'Reilly Product Metadata Interface (OPMI) exposes RDF for all of O'Reilly's titles, organized by ISBN. The OPMI is a REST API and supports the following data formats: XML, RDF, FOAF, MODS, MARC.

Open ContextOpen Context API: Open Context is a free, open access resource for the electronic publication of primary field research from archaeology, museum collections, and other field science datasets. Open Context provides a simple RESTful web service to get content expressed in XHTML (for human use in browsers), the supported Atom Syndication Format (plus GeoRSS extensions), JSON (Javascript Object Notation), and KML (the format used by GoogleEarth). The Atom-based web services provide a set of query options to request items from a collection.

John Musser

Comments

Comments(3)

User HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.