5 Productive To-Do List Apps With APIs

Adam DuVander
Jan. 25 2010, 02:19AM EST

Here's the secret to success, the one thing you need to make sure you do the things that are important to you: add them to a task list. And the best way to make sure that list is always easily accessible? Why, write a program to incorporate it into your life. And in this era of open APIs, you've got some good options to build on. Here are five APIs that will give you the tools to track your to-dos with minimal code.

Doris exposes nearly all of the site's functionality, including task groups, one of the major differences between this and other to-do list services. Update a task's status (is it done?), view the history and, of course, create tasks. Uses basic authentication and returns XML or JSON.

Our Doris API profile.

HiveminderHiveminder approaches its service in a way that lets the user decide how to use it. This ethos carries over to the API, too, which they say provides "building blocks to use Hiveminder however suits you best." In Hiveminder, tasks have tags and due dates. And the API can create, read, update and delete anything.

Our Hiveminder API profile.

NozbeNozbe is modeled after the Getting Things Done philosophy created by David Allen. The service uses projects and contexts to organize "next actions" (i.e., a to-do items). Nozbe's API gives access to each of those objects to make new actions and update others. And you'll have no trouble learning the platform--Nozbe has open-sourced its mobile version, which uses its own API.

Our Nozbe API profile.

Remember the MilkRemember the Milk is probably the most popular of the to-do list apps we've mentioned. It has mobile applications, Twitter integration and more. With several dozen methods, the API can access groups, contacts, lists and tasks. One of the more interesting features is the ability to associate a location with a task.

Our Remember The Milk API profile.

ToodledoToodledo is, at first blush, a basic-looking service. However, once you look down its list of features, you'll see how it can compete with the rest. It has folders and tagging for grouping tasks. It has due dates and priorities. And, yes, it has an API to access all of it. Toodledo also keeps things developer-friendly with community-contributed modules for popular programming languages.

Our Toodledo API profile.

Now that you have these five to-do list APIs to choose from, there's really no excuse for procrastination. Which one are you adding to your tasks?

Adam DuVander Hi! I'm Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and former Executive Editor of ProgrammableWeb. I currently serve as a Contributing Editor. If you have API news, or are interested in writing for ProgrammableWeb, please contact editor@programmableweb.com Though I'm a fan of anything API-related, my particular interest is in mapping. I've published a how-to book, Map Scripting 101, to get anyone started making maps on websites. In a not-so-distant past life I wrote for Wired and Webmonkey.

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Gabe

What about gubb? It may appear on the surface to deal with ANY kind of list (instead of the specific application of the todo) but it does have those kinds of features built in if you want to use them: priorities, reminders, etc. Its API is open and REST-based as well. I used it to make a .NET-based framework for gubb list management.

I should mention Toodledo has an iphone app which I find really usefulYou don't have to pay for the premium service to use it, unlike RTM.