7+ Years of Twitter on ProgrammableWeb

Adam DuVander
Feb. 17 2014, 12:00PM EST

Twitter will turn eight in March and the Twitter API will have its birthday toward the end of the year. It's been a long ride for something that started as sort of a side project. The service, and especially its API, saw quick growth, as the platform expanded, added features and eventually had to grow up. Below you'll find a chronology of Twitter API stories on ProgrammableWeb.

2006: Just Another Social App

The Twitter site launched publicly in mid-2006, but it wasn't until later in the year that the API was publicized. ProgrammableWeb was barely a year old at the time. Founder John Musser rounded up new APIs on a monthly basis and included the Twitter API announcement. At the time it was summarized as An API for “the global community of friends and strangers answering one simple question: What are you doing?”

2007: Growth in the API

2008: Expanding the Platform

2009: Features, Features and Often First in the API

2010: Twitter API's Biggest Year

2011: An API Grows Up

2012: A Less Open Twitter API

2013: A Business Model and an IPO

2014: In Progress

With an API at the center of Twitter's business model, the Twitter API is clearly still important to the microblogging company. Developers may never see the heyday of 2010 again, but there is room to build value atop the service, as long as some of that flows back to Twitter.

Adam DuVander is Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and Contributing Editor at ProgrammableWeb. Previously he edited this site and wrote for Wired. You can follow him on Twitter.

Adam DuVander Hi! I'm Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and former Executive Editor of ProgrammableWeb. I currently serve as a Contributing Editor. If you have API news, or are interested in writing for ProgrammableWeb, please contact editor@programmableweb.com Though I'm a fan of anything API-related, my particular interest is in mapping. I've published a how-to book, Map Scripting 101, to get anyone started making maps on websites. In a not-so-distant past life I wrote for Wired and Webmonkey.

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