Apple Makes Biggest Twitter Mashup Since Google

Adam DuVander
Nov. 11 2010, 04:45PM EST

Anyone using the Ping social network within Apple's iTunes music store can now syndicate their activity to Twitter. Already many are sharing their music interests on the microblogging platform, such as via the #nowplaying hashtag. While Ping does not include what's being played, it does syndicate purchases, comments, likes and status messages.

The mashup also goes the other way, with Twitter using content from iTunes, as Twitter notes in its announcement post. When Ping message are displayed on Twitter.com, it shows up in the preview pane with a playable music clip.

When Twitter unveiled its new design we called it one giant mashup, because the right side of the screen is reserved for previews of images and videos from sources linked in tweets. As expected, Twitter is expanding the sources from the 16 included at initial launch. Someday, perhaps, that space will also be open to developers.

As if Twitter needed more legitimacy, Apple has certainly helped it. But the biggest Twitter mashup of all time still belongs to Google, which has been drinking from the firehose for some time.

Particular searches will get Twitter results right up near the top, updating in real-time. Others will receive a link further down the page. And anyone wanting to search Twitter directly through Google can select "updates" from the tab on the left. Like this search for "twitter" and "apple", it also returns status updates from MySpace, Facebook and others. But Twitter, which has defaulted everyone to public since its inception, dominates the results.

Adam DuVander Hi! I'm Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and former Executive Editor of ProgrammableWeb. I currently serve as a Contributing Editor. If you have API news, or are interested in writing for ProgrammableWeb, please contact editor@programmableweb.com Though I'm a fan of anything API-related, my particular interest is in mapping. I've published a how-to book, Map Scripting 101, to get anyone started making maps on websites. In a not-so-distant past life I wrote for Wired and Webmonkey.

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