Bing Maps Says Go Ahead, Broadcast Your Mashup on TV

Matthew Casperson
Mar. 31 2010, 04:17PM EDT

Bing maps has announced that broadcasters can now freely display bird’s eye, aerial, road, hybrid, and Streetside images in their presentations. This post from the Bing community blog has the details:

A couple months ago we changed the Bing Maps Terms of Use in a post called Bing Maps Terms of Use Changes; Benefit Educators, Not-for-Profits and Developers. Well, we’ve gone a done it again. This time all you TV anchors are going to look so much hotter with a Bing Map playing behind your talking head. Oh, the ideas you can come up with for using anything in Bing Maps for free on your broadcast.

There are already a few examples of how this technology could be used, including a story by King5 that used a bird’s eye shot to illustrate an intersection which challenges the legality of tickets issued at a 5-way intersection via a camera system, and a YouTube video of Bing Maps StreetSide Geocasting with IncaX.

This recent change to the terms of service means broadcasters now enjoy some of the freedom that educational, non-profit and developers gained last year:

In November 2009, Microsoft introduced a range of modifications to the Bing Maps Terms of Use, allowing various organizations and developers to take advantage of the platform for free. The Redmond company revealed at that time that educational institutions and non-profit organizations would be able to leverage Bing Maps free of charge, and that companies would be permitted to develop on top of Bing Maps for free and only pay for usage once the product they built became commercially available.

There are some restrictions however, with broadcasters currently unable to use traffic data.

For more examples of Bing Maps mashups, visit our Bing Maps API profile.

Matthew Casperson Matthew is a freelance writer, focusing on web and multimedia technologies. His work can be found featured on Programmable Web, Brighthub, Hubfolio, Chrome Experiments, Informit, Flash Tuts Plus and The Tech Labs.

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