Cloudstock Hackathon Invites Devs to Mash the Cloud

Adam DuVander
Nov. 17 2010, 02:32PM EST

As part of the Woodstock for Cloud Developers, we at ProgrammableWeb are co-hosting the Cloudstock Hackathon on December 6th. Cloudstock is a free one day conference in San Francisco hosted by Salesforce for cloud developers of all kinds. The hackathon will be emceed by David Berlind and will include great prizes for top projects.

Cloudstock and the Hackathon are chances for developers to interact directly with API providers on hand. Some of the biggest names in cloud services have signed up for the Cloudstock sessions. Amazon will share tips for its web services, including S3 and EC2. Google will talk App Engine and Fusion Tables. LinkedIn will discuss both its REST and JavaScript APIs.

The Hackathon is where developers get a chance to show their stuff by mashing-up multiple APIs, either in teams or by themselves. At the end of the afternoon it's demo time. Each team will have a chance to give their elevator pitch and show off their app. Judges include ProgrammableWeb founder John Musser and VentureBeat's Matt Marshall.

Great prizes await the winners. Top developers can walk away with a MacBook Pro and iPad for each member of the team (up to three). There will also be prizes in a few special categories such as best mobile app and most commercial potential. Additional prizes will be given by providers specifically for innovative uses of their APIs.

The Hackathon, as with all of Cloudstock, is completely free. Find out more at the Cloudstock website.

Adam DuVander Hi! I'm Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and former Executive Editor of ProgrammableWeb. I currently serve as a Contributing Editor. If you have API news, or are interested in writing for ProgrammableWeb, please contact editor@programmableweb.com Though I'm a fan of anything API-related, my particular interest is in mapping. I've published a how-to book, Map Scripting 101, to get anyone started making maps on websites. In a not-so-distant past life I wrote for Wired and Webmonkey.

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