Feedly Opens API to All Developers to Encourage Creation of Feedly Cloud Apps

Janet Wagner, Data Journalist / Full Stack Developer
Sep. 20 2013, 08:00AM EDT

Feedly, one of the most popular alternatives to the defunct Google Reader, has just announced that the Feedly API is now open to all developers. Last month, Feedly kicked off a paid subscription service, Feedly Pro, offering the first 5,000 subscribers a lifetime subscription for $99.99. Feedly raised almost $500,000 within the first eight hours.

Feedly

Feedly has been working with fifty developers over the past six months to design the API so that it is suitable for use in a wide variety of applications and platforms. In addition, the Feedly API has already been integrated with apps and platforms such as IFTTT, gReader, ReadKit, Newsify, Sprout Social, Mr. Reader, PaperBoy, and many others.

One of the features of the Feedly API is the "personalization graph" which allows users to personalize how they use the Feedly service and their personalized settings remain the same across many apps. Feedly briefly touches on the concept of personalization on the Feedly Developer site:

"Millions of users depend on their Feedly for inspiration, information, and to feed their passions. But one size does not fit all. Individuals have different workflows, different habits, and different devices. In our efforts to evolve Feedly from a product to a platform, we have therefore decided to open up the Feedly API."

According to Feedly, the Feedly cloud processes up to 30+ million feeds per hour and the metadata for each feed can be accessed using the API feeds module. Developers interested in using the newly available Feedly API can find more information at the Feedly developer website.

Janet Wagner Janet is a data journalist and full stack developer based in Toledo, Ohio. Her focus revolves around APIs, open data, data visualization and data-driven journalism. Follow her on Twitter: @webcodepro and on Google+

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