Google Wave: Developer Preview and Hackathon

Andres Ferrate
Jun. 15 2009, 04:17AM EDT

If you're interested in learning more about the new Google Wave platform and API we covered last month, then take a look at this new post on the Google Wave Developer Blog from Google's Pamela Fox. It discusses a recent Wave API hackathon that occurred shortly after the Google I/O conference.

Wave Twilio Robot

Approximately 60 developers gathered at Google's headquarters in Mountain View, California to learn, code, and demo various robots and gadgets developed with the Wave API. In relatively short order, 17 demos were ready to showcase at the end of the day. Pamela has a nice summary of some of the demos, and as she discusses in her blog post, Lars Rasmussen, one of the key figures behind Wave and leader of the Google Wave team, was excited by what he saw.

At the end of all the demos (too many to describe here!), Lars thanked all the developers and said, "I was so happy after seeing the first two demos, I nearly cried." We were all awed by how enthusiastically the developers dove into the APIs that day, and the great stuff they came up with in such a short period of time. We're hoping to replicate the awesomeness at the upcoming Google Wave API Day in Sydney on June 19th, and perhaps see some Australian themed extensions (Kangaroo-ey? Matey?).

If you were one of the lucky developers that already has access to the Google Wave sandbox, you can check out the robots and gadgets developed during the hackathon. Otherwise, if you haven't already done so, you can request access to the developer preview to be able to code, test, and interact with other developers in the sandbox. Once you gain access, you will note that developers are already using Wave itself to communicate and collaborate with the Google Wave team, which in itself is a good way to become familiar with this new platform.

Stay tuned for additional information on Google Wave as it becomes available (or track news via our Wave API Profile). In the meantime, be sure to check out the video (also embedded below) from Google I/O and reference documentation if you have not done so already.

Andres Ferrate

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