How I Used APIs to Build an API Jobs Site

Guest Author
Mar. 28 2012, 11:31AM EDT

John Sheehan is a consultant in San Francisco focusing on APIs and Developer Experience. Previously, John was a Product Manager and the first Developer Evangelist at Twilio. You can find him on Twitter @johnsheehan

Two months ago I was looking for a side project to spend my time on keeping the saw sharp. I noticed there was no central place to find jobs related to my favorite technology: APIs. There were a lot of API-focused companies out there looking to hire, and a lot of companies looking to hire people specifically to work on API integrations, but no central place to connect employers with candidates that shared their passion for all things HTTP. I found a suitable domain and two months later, API Jobs was born.

I wanted to make sure the quality of job posted on the site remained high so there are a few rules. First and foremost, no recruiting agencies. Jobs must be posted directly by the company hiring them. Postings are also limited to API-focused companies, or jobs where the majority of the work is focused on building or integrating APIs.

The first batch of featured jobs span a variety of different types, demonstrating just how much the API industry has matured:

What you see today is just the beginning. In the future I'll be adding better aggregation, saved searches, more feeds, filters by location or job type and much more. And, of course, an API (coming soon).

Building the site was also a great reminder of what a great time it is to be building web apps. The site is hosted on Heroku, uses Redis To Go for the database, SendGrid for email, Stripe for payments, Searchify for search, and the Twitter API to publicize posts. Putting the pieces together was incredibly easy, especially with the jumpstart Twitter Bootstrap can give you on the UI (don't settle for the default theme though). I'll be doing a write up on my blog soon going into more detail about each of the pieces.

If you're interested in posting a job on the site, ProgrammableWeb readers can use this link to save $50.

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