Instant Geo-tweet Maps: Just Add UMapper

Adam DuVander
Feb. 28 2010, 02:10PM EST

A dearth of geotweets didn't stop UMapper (our UMapper API profile). Viewing geocoded tweets on a map is now super-easy, thanks to the snazzy Flash mapping platform's new feature.

From the UMapper blog:

After two weeks of intensive testing, the Twitter Search template is ready for release! It is now easier than ever to create interactive maps with real-time Twitter feeds. You can display all tweets from a location or filter results by a specific keyword.

A search for "Olympics" in Vancouver is embedded in the map below. Drag the map to a new location and a new set of tweets is downloaded.

As with everything UMapper does, the attention to design and detail is apparent here. Each Twitter avatar is displayed within a circular marker and the search radius is also visualized.

If you create your own, you can choose between several imagery options, set the initial search center and optionally start with a specific keyword search.

Adam DuVander Hi! I'm Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and former Executive Editor of ProgrammableWeb. I currently serve as a Contributing Editor. If you have API news, or are interested in writing for ProgrammableWeb, please contact editor@programmableweb.com Though I'm a fan of anything API-related, my particular interest is in mapping. I've published a how-to book, Map Scripting 101, to get anyone started making maps on websites. In a not-so-distant past life I wrote for Wired and Webmonkey.

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You can retrieve a user's tweets directly, like this:
http://api.twitter.com/1/statuses/user_timeline.json?screen_name=ryan505

Within there, if the tweets have been entered with a location, that will be available in the geocode object (as is the case with Ryan's above). From there, the geocodes can be added to a map.

If you don't know how or want to learn to create a map, there are sites that take your Twitter feed and turn it into a map. This one appears to do your own timeline, but I haven't tried it:
http://www.tweography.com/