Local Deals For Your App an API Call Away

Adam DuVander
Aug. 11 2010, 09:03PM EDT

Mobile phones and an increasing interest in location on the web have fueled a number of coupon and deal websites. Each seems gunning to be the site for local specials, albeit with a slightly different angle. And another thing in common? They usually have an API.

Adility is the latest addition, praised by Business Insider as the "SimpleGeo of Local Deals" (which seems even higher praise for the still-new SimpleGeo API, a location database platform). The comparison works in that Adility is focused on being a platform for local deals, rather than a destination. Through the API, developers can find local deals to display and, it seems, collect a portion of the revenue that Adility receives.

The Deal Map (shown above) is one of Adility's launch partners. The map shows Adility deals, as well as those from other coupon and deal providers. The Deal Map also has an API of its own, which certainly would make me question the terms of service of these providers. However, when it comes to local deals, the revenue is baked into the API. Spreading it far and wide of actually beneficial to everyone.

GrouponOne of the deal sources for The Deal Map is Groupon, which has quickly become the old-timer of local deals. The Groupon API launched this spring, coming off $135 million dollars of funding. Groupon keeps it simple with one offer per day for every city where it has a presence, currently about 90 in the United States.

FoursquareLocation-sharing service Foursquare has a similar feature, showing specials at or near a venue. This data is also made available via the API and has made its way into mashups like 4SquareOffers (pictured above).

Adam DuVander Hi! I'm Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and former Executive Editor of ProgrammableWeb. I currently serve as a Contributing Editor. If you have API news, or are interested in writing for ProgrammableWeb, please contact editor@programmableweb.com Though I'm a fan of anything API-related, my particular interest is in mapping. I've published a how-to book, Map Scripting 101, to get anyone started making maps on websites. In a not-so-distant past life I wrote for Wired and Webmonkey.

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Adam.

I just wanted to clarify he differentiation between adility api and deal sites api.

The Adility API let' developers create any type of application where the local deal content, coupons or gift cards from the Adility local business database can be used. The developers can charge the consumers credit card, build their own application and grow their own subscribers and customers.

Adility has contractual relationships with local businesses and shares this relationship with its developers and publishers, so they do not have to go out and build a sales force and sign up local merchants. Local businesses have dominantly three types of local "content" that are relevant to lbs and application developers:

a) deals

b) gift cards

c) coupons

There is not much other content outside of these three different products that is relevant as a monetization tool for publishers and developers. Adility brings all of them to the table for the developers to use within their applications - as checkin rewards for example.