Magnify.net API Brings Video Channels to Any Site

Jordan Running
Sep. 24 2008, 03:26AM EDT

Magnify.net, a web service that allows individuals and companies to build and curate their own video channels and communities, has announced an API to enable developers to pull videos and data from their Magnify.net channels and integrate them into their own applications (details at our Magnify.net API Profile).

From Magnify.net's API page:

The Magnify API frees your channel's functionality from its layout. All content that is discovered, reviewed and published by Magnify on your behalf can now be taken anywhere. You can search, browse and display your videos, playlists, users and comments for use on your own site or in your web application. You can build widgets tuned to your exact needs. You can mix, match and mash all of these to use your video in ways we've never imagined. And this is only the initial release: stay tuned for even more power.

The API takes simple REST queries and responses are delivered in Atom format. Applications can query video content, playlists, users, and user activity such as comments, ratings, and tags. In order to embed videos from Magnify.net in third-party applications, the Atom response for a content query includes a media:content element with a url value, which can be used as the src in an iframe.

For authentication, developers will use an API key and for end-users of applications built on the API, Magnify.net offers a single sign-on cookie system, which lets them log onto a channel without having to leave the application.

To get started with the Magnify.net API, the Developer's Guide is the place to start. Sample code, as well as a PHP client library, is also provided, and a demo site gives several examples of the API in action. Their source code is provided on the sample code page.

Video APIs and mashups continue to be one of the most active segments of the web platform, with over 50 video APIs now available. For more on video APIs and mashups, see our Video API and Mashup Dashboard.

Jordan Running I'm a serial tinkerer living in the midwest and dreaming of a totally machine-readable, interoperable future.

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