OneTok's SaaS Voice Recognition Announces its Beyond Beta

Eric Carter, Founder & Corporate Counsel, Dartsand
Sep. 21 2012, 09:00AM EDT

OneTok pulled its voice recognition technology out of beta and has launched The OneTok API to the masses. OneTok delivers voice recognition to any app on Android, Blackberry 10, or iOS. OneTok provides its software in a cloud based (SaaS) model. According to co-founder and CEO, Ben Lilienthal, "Today’s voice-enablement tools are overly complex and designed to make their vendors money. OneTok puts developers first, freeing them to focus on providing a great user experience."

OneTok allows "developers configure any word or phrase to invoke any activity in their app, all with just a few clicks." For instance, High Street Bank integrated OneTok into their app with commands like "Where is the nearest ATM" and "I want to draw money." Each of these voice commands, in addition to a slew of others, triggers a response within the application (e.g. locates an ATM on a map or starts the withdrawal process).

Voice sentences are stored in OneTok's platform and broken down by part of speech (e.g. verb, noun, etc.). The speech context correlates to pre-defined rules the developer creates. The rules then pass back to the application and the function performs within the app. Sign-up and integration is free. Beginning in 2013, OneTok will expand the pay-for-use model to a success based plan. Many suggest that "voice recognition is arguably one of the more desirable mobile app features." OneTok's simplicity and platform agnostic approach could serve it well as it takes on a quickly developing area of mobile apps.

Eric Carter Eric is the founder of Dartsand and Corporate Counsel for a specialty technology distributor. He is a frequent contributor to technology media outlets and also serves as primary legal counsel for multiple startups in the Real Estate, Virtual Assistant, and Software Development Industries. Follow me on Google+

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brad

HTML5 is really a godsend for app makers/distributors on a tight budget. You can make one app that works on Windows/Mac and iOS/Android/Windows Phone/Blackberry, etc. It's helping SaaS to get very popular, which is definitely a plus for developers and users.