Today in APIs: New Twitter API Console, Amazon In-App Purchasing, and 4 New APIs

Kevin Sundstrom
Jan. 23 2013, 12:19PM EST

Adam Green released a new Twitter API Console that deserves a look. Amazon has expanded in-app purchasing to Mac, Pc, and Web platforms. Plus: 7 important considerations for building a dynamic API and 4 new APIs

A Simple Way to Test Twitter Requests

TwitterAdam Green, a Twitter API consultant and the mastermind behind 140dev, just released a free tool designed to help Twitter developers test API requests. The new API Console allows developers to, “...enter just the description of the request and quickly see the complete response without having to write any test code.” Try out the Twitter API Console and leave a comment sharing your thoughts.

Amazon Announced In-App Purchasing for Mac, PC, and Web-based Games

Amazon has provided in-app purchasing services to Kindle Fire and Android developers since back in April of 2012. Yesterday, the company announced that it would expand this luxury to Mac, Pc, and Web based platforms. Amazon believes that this advancement will help developers, “...move more quickly, increase engagement, sell more content and reach new customers.”

API News You Shouldn't Miss

4 New APIs

Today we had 4 new APIs added to our API directory including a u.s. occupation and job information service, a geographic location descriptor service, an hr recruiting service, and a long tweet service,. Below is more details on each of these new APIs. O*NETO*NET API: The service from the U.S. Department of Labor provides authoritative information about occupational descriptions and projected employment demand across the nation's economy. It offers the U.S. government's official taxonomy of job titles and Standard Occupation Classification (SOC) codes. Also available are tools for career investigation and planning, questionnaires to analyze and categorize job duties, and hiring guidelines for employers. API methods support access to career overview materials grouping job definitions by required skills and experience, personality traits, technologies used, and more. Methods also provide updated employment outlook for occupations and categories. The API gives programmatic access to interest profiler functions that present questions and accept responses to suggestion occupations suited to specific areas of interest. OCLC MapFASTOCLC MapFAST API: The service provides place names for geographic locations as specified in the Faceted Application of Subject Terminology (FAST) list of subject headings. That list adapts the authoritative subject headings from the U.S. Library of Congress (LCSH) for simplified application of complex rules. The streamlined structure allows rigorous application of standard terminology across large volumes of materials within manageable workflows. The service applies a subset of those terms identifying places by standard names based on location coordinates. API methods accept one or more locations based on latitude and longitude plus a radius specifying the size of the region of interest. The API returns the applicable term(s) from the FAST list. SendoutsSendouts API: The service provides functions for third-party staffing agencies, including open job listings, both summary and detailed, job search, and candidate management functions such as skills listings and job seeker profiles. Applications can interact with the service to help recruiters to post jobs, allow job seekers to find opportunities, and handle resume submissions and the hiring process. API methods support creation of job orders to post open positions along with job searches by formal position title, keyword in the job description, category, and location. Methods also support submission of applications by job seekers and review of applications by recruiters. SnaptwitSnaptwit API: Snaptwit allowing users the ability to have their application send long tweets over the 140 character limit. Snaptwit is an alternative to mobile twitter which improves the usability of Twitter. Snaptwit API uses RESTful protocol and responses format is using JSON.

Kevin Sundstrom

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