Vegas Hack Disrupts Open Data

Kyle Kelly
Feb. 28 2013, 10:52AM EST

If you weren't at the #VegasHack public data hackathon on Saturday, February 23, 2013, you sure missed an “open data” great time. Vegas Hack and Code For America collaborated to bring a civic innovation hackathon for people dedicated to finding new solutions to address real issues in the community.

Over 50 developers and designers were invited to the one day event for the Las Vegas innovation community to meet, hack and collaborate on ideas at Work In Progress.

Here’s what you missed:

13 teams of hackers competed for open data, with several walking away as winners at the end of the night. Some highlights include: Fitendo uses your Fitbit data to show how many steps Super Mario would take using the Fitbit API. With FluBuddies you can "check in" to your illness, and receive information from CDC back to you (created by local high school students). Terror Alerts uses the Homeland Security API and integrates Twilio and SendGrid to receive information about terror alerts currently active. Can I Sprinkle? scraped government data and turned it into their own API.

The Vegas Tech community continues to foster tech innovation and creativity with its ongoing collection of events, hackathons, meetups, and venture investments. Many companies and local startups pitched in to sponsor the event, including a museum and a pants company.

Sign up and stay tuned for more information about future Vegas Hack events.

Kyle Kelly

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Alana

Hi there,
Great initiative. I just wanted to know your thoughts on whether there's a place for hacker integration into mainstream IT practices,seeing as it is that most of these guys are privy to DDOS attacks(which have become increasingly common these days). Also, is there such a thing as an 'ethical hacker'?
Alana