Visit Your Favorite Twilight Locations on a Bing Map

Adam DuVander
Nov. 26 2009, 01:54AM EST

Okay, you can admit it. Either you love the Twilight books and movies, or you pretend to hate them for fear that you might actually dig it. In any case, you certainly have a Twilight fan you can send to this virtual Twilight tour of Forks, Washington, and the surrounding locations from the movies (click "explore locations").

Twilight Map

The mashup uses Bing Maps (our Bing Maps API profile) and Silverlight to let the user explore points of interest, such as the Cullen House and Forks Hospital. Everything is layered over the map of the actual city of Forks.

Twilight mileage markersSome locations, such as the beach, are many miles away from Forks. Semi-transparent, clickable mileage markers pan the user to these far-off locations. This is where Silverlight seems to shine, providing a smooth transition, then zooming in eerily to the clicked location.

But there's an even bigger reason the map uses Silverlight, as Bing evangelist Chris Pendleton explains:

The application uses Bing Maps Silverlight control not just for location context, but also because of the native integration with media elements like video and audio. In fact, the Bing Maps Silverlight control interactive SDK has samples on how to overlay scalable (and non-scalable) video feeds right into the control. So, technically, you could do this with you favorite character.

As much as I prefer a JavaScript map implementation, it's hard to argue with this user experience. For certain interactions, Flash and Silverlight maps are the way to go. And I'm sure once all you Twilight fans see this site, you'll agree.

Adam DuVander Hi! I'm Developer Communications Director for SendGrid and former Executive Editor of ProgrammableWeb. I currently serve as a Contributing Editor. If you have API news, or are interested in writing for ProgrammableWeb, please contact editor@programmableweb.com Though I'm a fan of anything API-related, my particular interest is in mapping. I've published a how-to book, Map Scripting 101, to get anyone started making maps on websites. In a not-so-distant past life I wrote for Wired and Webmonkey.

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