VoteNight.com Wants Your Electoral Predictions

Curtis Chen
Sep. 06 2012, 08:00AM EDT

It's just about two months until the next U.S. Presidential election. And regardless of who you plan to vote for, you probably have an opinion about which candidate you think will win. The new mash-up web site VoteNight gives you an opportunity to share your predictions with the slick use of the Google Maps API.

Built by Intel software engineer Rakshith Krishnappa--who has created several other map mash-ups--VoteNight.com combines Google Maps, Facebook Connect, and historical election data to provide a simple interface for users to create custom electoral maps. Logging in with a Facebook account is not required, but the site "use[s] facebook just to make sure people using VoteNight.com are real people" and enables additional sharing features when logged in.

Despite scant instructions, the site's interface is pretty intuitive: click on a state to cycle it between red, blue, or gray, and the bar graph below the map changes to show how many total votes would go to President Obama, the Republican challenger Mr. Romney, or remain undecided. There's also an option to pop-up a display of how many electoral votes each state will cast, and a pull-down menu to display how states voted in the last twenty Presidential elections, going back to 1932.

Once you've created your personal prediction map, you can embed it on your own site, or--if you're logged in via Facebook--share it with your friends. Krishnappa himself is on Facebook and Twitter, and looking for feedback on VoteNight.com. You can also check out his other projects at Init Labs or his ProgrammableWeb profile, which lists many previous Mashup of the Day winners.

Curtis Chen Once a software engineer in Silicon Valley; now a science fiction writer and puzzle hunt maker near Portland, Oregon. You may have seen his "Cat Feeding Robot" Ignite presentation. Curtis is not an aardvark.

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