W3C Introduces Three APIs for TV Control, Geolocation, and Web Mentions

The W3C has recently announced three APIs that address a number of issues across industries. The TV Control API, the Geolocation API, and the Webmention API are in various stages of development, but are all newsworthy for their potential applications in today's connected world. TV Control is now a working draft. Geolocation has reached its second edition, and Webmention is a proposed recommendation.

The TV Control API enables webpages to integrate with televisions and other media devices. Audio and video HTML elements are used to present audio and video from Web applications to television, radio, IPTV, and other sources. Additionally, the API presents access to program and service information and enables the scheduling and replay of recordings. Objects include TVManager, TVTuner, TVSource, TVMediaStream, srcObject, HTMLMediaElement, TVMediaStreaminterface and more. The goal of the TV Control Working Group "is to provide methods that enable a webpage to browse and control channel-based audio and video sources such as a TV or a radio tuner."

The Geolocation API "provides scripted access to geographical location information associated with the hosting device." The API was first proposed in May 2012, and it has grown tremendously over the years. The API utilizes a multitude of location information sources. Such sources include GPS, network signals, RFID, WiFi, Bluetooth MAC addresses, GSM/CDMA cell IDs, user input, and much more. Based on such sources, there's a good chance the API can find a pretty accurate location, but W3C is sure to confirm that no guarantees around a device's specific location are given.

The Webmention API "provides a mechanism for a webpage to notify another webpage when it mentions its URL, and when the content around the mention changes or is deleted." From a practical standpoint, a user can receive notification when a third party site mentions the user's site. The API may have a significant role in the continued growth of a decentralized, social Web. Content is automatically connected without the need for integration or setup agreements. The Social Web Working Group is requesting comments on the recommendation through November 30.

Eric Carter Eric the founder of Dartsand and Corporate Counsel for a specialty technology distributor. He is a frequent contributor to technology media outlets and also serves as primary legal counsel for multiple startups in the Real Estate, Virtual Assistant, and Software Development Industries. Follow me on Google+

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