What?! Zombie Apocalypse Explicitly Covered In Amazon's Terms of Service

The year is 2020 and the world has plunged into a zombie-infested apocalypse. Earth’s remaining developers have come together in a desperate attempt to create some sort of autonomous, zombie-killing machine. Luckily, there’s a platform they can use that won’t get them into legal trouble. That’s right! Deep within the Terms of Service for Amazon’s new game engine Lumberyard, Amazon includes a clause incase the dead somehow reanimate.

Amazon announced this week the release of Lumberyard, a cross-platform, 3D game engine based off of CryEngine. Use of Lumberyard is free provided that any relevant cloud services are purchased through Amazon. Amazon has also restricted the use of Lumberyard for any,

“life-critical or safety-critical systems such as use in operation of medical equipment, automated transportation systems, autonomous vehicles, aircraft or air traffic control, nuclear facilities, manned spacecraft, or military use in connection with live combat.”

Nonetheless, if there is a zombie apocalypse, Amazon is prepared to retract these restrictions. According to Section 57.10 of Lumberyard’s Terms of Service.

"However, this restriction will not apply in the event of the occurrence (certified by the United States Centers for Disease Control or successor body) of a widespread viral infection transmitted via bites or contact with bodily fluids that causes human corpses to reanimate and seek to consume living human flesh, blood, brain or nerve tissue and is likely to result in the fall of organized civilization."

Why Amazon included these statements is yet unknown. Some have argued this cheeky provision has helped spread the word about Lumberyards release and certainly, is has created a small buzz in the developer community. Or perhaps, in this humble writer’s opinion, Amazon has reasons to believe this clause could soon be relevant.

Original Article

Amazon's New Game Engine Has A Zombie Clause

John Piela

Comments

Comments(1)

DGDMarketing

Pretty i9nteresting that a company such as Amazon would write something like this especially in the Legal/Law area on thier site defo worth a python script to keep tabs on future mentions.