Yes API Gives You Real-time and Historical Radio Playlists

Kevin Farnham
Dec. 02 2008, 02:58AM EST

Yes.com is a unique community-oriented music site that provides real-time and historical information about songs played on United States terrestrial radio stations. Besides this up-to-the-minute database, Yes has social features like chat rooms for specific radio stations or for a specific artists, like the Yes.com Pink Floyd page showing which radio stations are currently playing or recently played Pink Floyd songs. In addition they also offer an API that developers can build on (our Yes API profile).

The API provides methods to search for radio stations, song logs, the top 100 song chart for a station, and more. Paul Lamere over at Sun recently evaluated the Yes API, and had this to say:

This is a gold mine of data about popular music. Folks interested in automatic generation of playlists can mine song sequences from professionally curated playlists. Music marketeers can learn what music is popular in various geographic locations. Music recommenders can mine data about what songs are being played together on the radio stations.

The Yes API is REST-based with data is returned in JSON format. The API is open: no signup is required, no API key is required, and there are no daily limits on calls to the API. The API is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works license. Developers should reference the Yes API Terms of Use for additional licensing details (for example, the conditions for commercial use and real-time feeds).

Embeddable code/widgets that use the API are available at http://get.yes.com. The Yes API mailing list is available for discussion of the API and its applications. See our Yes API profile for additional information.


We now have 2 Yes mashups in our directory built on the Yes API: iRadioApp.com and RadioHog.com. RadioHog lets you search for radio stations by call sign or zip code (more at our RadioHog profile). With iRadioApp shown above (our iRadioApp profile), you can select a city and see all the songs that are playing right now on area radio stations.

Yes.com and the Yes API are an exciting development in the realm of music information databases. Paul Lamere's commendations are right on target:

Well done to the Yes.com developers for providing such a clean and easy to use API - and well done to the Yes.com business folk who realize the value in making this data available.

Kevin Farnham

Comments

Comments(3)

User HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.

Where do they get the data? There is no cheap way top get it. This seems sketchy. I smell a lawsuit.