Box Overhauls its Developer Experience

Today, Box announced a number of new features intended to reimagine the developer experience with the entire Box platform, including its APIs. New developer tools including an API Navigator, an API explorer, and crowd-sourced API docs deliver greater access and flexibility when working with Box APIs and documentation. As the company continues to market itself as a platform as opposed to a simple file sharing/storing app, today's overhaul certainly makes a solid appeal to developers across the board.

The API Navigator provides a visually appealing and easily accessible split-screen view of a sample application and the corresponding API calls and responses. Developers can test and adjust code in a single screen by directly viewing API activity against application behavior. With the API Navigator, developers can get a feel for how features like file search, watermarking, and more can be integrated and used with a third party app.

Additionally, a new interactive API explorer was added to the Box API reference. The explorer allows developers to interact with the Box API directly within the docs. Once logged into a Box account, developers can make live API calls with custom parameters and see Box API responses from within the docs. Developers can then copy and paste code samples into a third party app's codebase.

Further, Box is opening up its API docs to its entire developer community. Any Box developer can now suggest edits, adds, and samples to the Box API reference docs. The add or edit is then sent to the Box team for review and approval. Box anticipates that opening up API docs to a crowd-sourced model will improve its overall documentation and enhance the developer experience by building a collaborative environment. Checkout live community editing here.

While most of today's announcements revolve around new developer tools, Box released a few updates to its SDKs. The SDKs now support .NET Core (.NET's cross-platform version). The addition is meant to cater to the growing use of .NET on non-Windows platforms. Additionally, Box added greater Box API support to the SDKs. For a list of all SDK updates, check out the changelog

Eric Carter Eric the founder of Dartsand and Corporate Counsel for a specialty technology distributor. He is a frequent contributor to technology media outlets and also serves as primary legal counsel for multiple startups in the Real Estate, Virtual Assistant, and Software Development Industries. Follow me on Google+

Comments

Comments(1)

clak

For companies, information is the second most valuable thing next to employees. In such context, it is very risky to store sensitive corporate data in 3rd party servers (Box, dropbox or google drive) and pay an exorbitant monthly fees to access it. There are many good self-hosted file sharing systems available that can provide significant cost savings, better user experience and total control of corporate data. Check out products like FileCloud (http://www.getfilecloud.com/box-vs-tonido-filecloud/) or Filr.