Google Creates a New Home for Open Source Initiatives

This week, Google introduced a new home for all of its open source projects. Opensource.google.com is a new website where Google will bring together its many open source initiatives. In addition to an ongoing list of Google's open source initiatives, Google will provide information regarding how it uses, releases, and supports open source.

"The new site showcases the breadth and depth of our love for open source," Will Norris of Google's Open Source Programs Office commented in a blog post announcement. "It will contain the expected things: our programs, organizations we support, and a comprehensive list of open source projects we've released. But it also contains something unexpected: a look under the hood at how we 'do' open source."

Open source software has been entrenched in Google's DNA since its inception. To date, Google has published "millions of lines of open source code." Further, Google runs programs like Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in to promote open source development. It has also long sponsored leading open source communities like the Software Freedom Conservancy, the Apache Foundation, and others.

Prior to the launch of opensource.google.com, Google maintained over 100 GitHub organizations and its own self-hosted Git service to support its open source projects. The new site contains a single, directory of open source projects that will continue to grow as Google expands its work in the space. With a "more is better" view of open source, the directory should greatly streamline the hunt for Google open source resources.

A major objective with the new site is to explain how Google engages in the open source world. Beyond just code, Google approaches open source from a community and process perspective. For starters, Google published process docs at the site to guide both the company and those working with the company. In addition to the "how", Google will share "why" it makes certain decisions around licensing, patches, updates, policies, and procedures. Such information should help bridge communication gaps between open source-focused development groups/developers and one of the largest corporations on earth. Check out the site to learn more.

Eric Carter Eric the founder of Dartsand and Corporate Counsel for a specialty technology distributor. He is a frequent contributor to technology media outlets and also serves as primary legal counsel for multiple startups in the Real Estate, Virtual Assistant, and Software Development Industries. Follow me on Google+
 

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