How Devs Benefit From the New U.S. Government-Wide Digital Registry API

For external developers working at platform-based companies, the Digital Registry API will allow a quick and seamless way to quickly authenticate new accounts and provide the little blue tick that has become the intuitive icon for confirming a legit account. Emerging platforms like, for example, Blockspring, could use such an API to confirm that their integrations after definitive government sources.

Testing the API

The GSA is currently inviting third party developers to participate in UX testing of the API. To start, developers can use an OAI sandbox to test API calls.

OAI sandbox

ABOVE: Searching for a government agency in the sandbox reveals that the Executive Office of the President has 30 social media accounts.

ABOVE: Using the agency ID for the Executive Office of the President (Agency ID #821) reveals the full 30 social media accounts.

Five Use Cases for External Developers

Beyond platform businesses wanting to verify that new accounts are official government sources, there are other opportunities where the Registry can be a useful API resource to integrate into existing and new products and processes for a wide range of developers.

1. Building a Dashboard for a Local Disaster Recovery News Service

Local media or city governments could use the Registry service to identify all department accounts relevant to disaster recovery or emergency management.

“Sometimes the information someone needs can come on a platform where they may not know to look, from a organization they may not know exists,” GDSA’s Social Gov Lead, Justin Herman, told ProgramnmableWeb. “This can turn from inconvenience to a critical lapse in times of emergency. By analyzing all accounts across government, regardless of platform, organization or language, industries can develop services that deliver the fastest, most trusted information available anywhere.”

Developers for a news service, radio, local newspaper or civic tech business looking to support first responders could use the API to identify all relevant government social media accounts that respond to emergencies and use an aggregate service or social media dashboard product to monitor feeds in realtime.

Mark Boyd is a ProgrammableWeb writer covering breaking news, API business strategies and models, open data, and smart cities.
 

Comments